Share your research

A conference presenter at the NCUWM poster session

Conference Presentations

The Nebraska Conference for Undergraduate Women in Mathematics is a wonderful environment for undergraduate women to get experience presenting their research. We expect to have space for 48 15-minute talks, as well as a few small poster sessions. Speakers and poster presenters are expected to provide abstracts of their presentations at the time of application, and to present on research they have conducted either individually or as part of a research group. Within two weeks of submitting your abstract on the NCUWM application page, you will receive an email notifying you of your talk or poster status. Please contact us at ncuwm@unl.edu if you have any questions regarding your presentation.

Research Presentations

Instructions

You will have 15 minutes for your talk, including time for questions. If you aim to cover your talk in 13 minutes, this should allow enough time. Please prepare your talk in PDF or Powerpoint (old or new) format.

Preparing the abstract

Your abstract should be a short description of what you will be covering in your talk. Keep in mind that your presentation should be accessible to other undergraduate conference participants. When you submit your abstract online, please write it in plain text (without unusual symbols or fonts) or in LaTeX. The abstract should not be copied and pasted from elsewhere, even from your own paper or a previous presentation. You will have space to submit up to 1,024 characters (or approximately 150 words) for your abstract. Once we review and approve your abstract, we can confirm your talk in the schedule. We will send you an e-mail with the confirmation by the end of October. Due to the limited number of talk slots, we encourage you to submit your abstract as soon as possible.

Organizing your talk
Although the talks at NCUWM are open to the entire UNL community, most of the audience will be other undergraduates who may not be as familiar with your research topic as you are. Moreover, your audience will have a variety of backgrounds. You will want to make sure that your talk contains enough background material so that it is understandable to everyone for a large part of your talk. A typical talk will contain a brief outline or motivating example, necessary background and motivation for your research, research results, and conclusions/summary. This is a lot to fit into 13 minutes, so you will want to practice your talk several times to see how to use that time most efficiently. You may also want to identify a few slides that you can skip or quickly paraphrase in the event that you end up running out of time. Finally, the artistic design of your talk will affect your audience's ability to follow along. A good strategy is to keep your slides as simple and uncluttered as possible, with large enough font so that people in the back of the room can read it. When you give your talk, be sure to speak loudly and at a slow enough pace for everyone to follow.

Useful links to help you prepare a talk

Poster Exhibitions

Instructions

Poster presenters are expected to be present with their posters during the poster session. Many people will want to talk to you about your research. You will want your poster to convey your research problem clearly, and the progress you have made on it. It should contain the research problem, the background information, your research results, and your conclusions. You may want to practice explaining your poster so that you are prepared.

Preparing the abstract

Your abstract should be a short description of what your poster presentation will show. Keep in mind that your presentation should be accessible to other undergraduate conference participants. When you submit your abstract online, please write it in plain text (without unusual symbols or fonts) or in LaTeX. The abstract should not be copied and pasted from elsewhere, even from your own paper or a previous presentation. You will have space to submit up to 1000 characters (approximately 150 words) for your abstract. After receiving your abstract, we will send you an e-mail confirming your poster by the end of October.

Details on preparing your poster

You should prepare your poster in a Beamer or PowerPoint presentation format, but the final poster should be a single PDF page, since each poster will be viewed virtually in its own Zoom breakout room (or similar platform). Links to poster presentation PDFs may be made available to participants to individually view along with the presentations.

Divide your poster horizontally or vertically into three or four sections. Space information proportionally. Background color is up to you; however, lighter colors (pastels, greys) typically provide the best contrast for text, graphic, and photographic elements. Use a light background with darker photos or a dark background with lighter photos. Look critically at your layout. Cluttered posters are difficult to read. Your poster should stimulate discussion, not give a long presentation. When in doubt, edit. Choose one or two fonts and use them throughout. The text on your poster should be legible on your computer screen without having to zoom in. A general recommendation is to avoid text smaller than 12pt font size on your posters. Add emphasis by using boldface, underlining, or color; italics are difficult to read. Remember that white space is important to increase visual appeal and readability (this is the “empty” space between sections, columns, headings, blocks of text, and graphics).